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Wedding Business Solutions Podcast with Alan Berg CSP - What's your elevator pitch?What’s your elevator pitch?

I was consulting with a client and his sales team the other day and I asked them to tell me, in 7 seconds or less, what it is that they do. After stumbling over their words they realized that they couldn’t do it. It’s called an ‘elevator-pitch’ because the theory is that you have to be able to explain to someone what you do, while in an elevator, before they get to their floor. Many people think that their elevator-pitch can be 30 seconds. That’s way, way too long. Listen to this 9-minute episode and find out how to craft your elevator pitch so you’ll be ready, whether at a wedding show or on line at the grocery store when someone asks “What do you do?”

If you have any questions about anything in this, or any of my podcasts, or have a suggestion for a topic or guest, please reach out directly to me at Alan@WeddingBusinessSolutions.com or visit my website www.AlanBerg.com

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Below is a full transcript. If you have any questions about anything in this, or any of my podcasts, or have a suggestion for a topic or guest, please reach out directly to me at Alan@WeddingBusinessSolutions.com or contact me via textuse the short form on this page, or call 732.422.6362

Please be sure to subscribe to this podcast and leave a review (thanks, it really does make a difference). If you want to get notifications of new episodes and upcoming workshops and webinars, you can sign up at www.ConnectWithAlanBerg.com

 

– You get on an elevator, you have till the fifth floor to tell the person next to you what you do, can you do it? Listen to this episode and find out more. The elevator pitch, you’ve heard of the phrase, you might have even tried one yourself, or maybe you haven’t, but the concept behind it is simple. You get on an elevator, you have to tell the person next to you, what you do before they get to their floor, and hopefully it’s a tall building for you, right? Where you get to do that. But the thing is that, I remember being told that an elevator pitch should be less than 30 seconds. This is years ago, 30 seconds is an eternity. You can’t have a 30 second elevator pitch. Nobody wants to hear that. The key is, how do you engage them right away, right away with an elevator pitch so that they’re going to want to hear more and they’ll give you permission to say more.

When you try to do your elevator pitch, which by the way you should be able to do on a moment’s notice, somebody you meet someone at a networking event, you meet them on line at the grocery store, or you meet them somewhere, can you tell someone what you do? Too often, the elevator pitches are too long, too often, they’re too much about you. See the key is, if you’re talking to a potential customer and you’re going to give your elevator pitch it has to be about them. What’s the benefit to them that they’re going to go, “Oh, I want to find out more about that.” So for me, my elevator pitch, I help wedding and event businesses just like yours sell more, profit more and have more fun doing it. And if you’re a wedding and event business, and you’re hearing that, is that something that you’re going to want to hear more about?

I have a good friend of mine, Shep Hyken, H-Y-K-E-N. Shep is one of the leading customer service experts in the world. He’s got some great books, I would definitely look them up. As a matter of fact, on the Resources page on my website, alanberg.com, there’s a Resources page. You can scroll down, you can see a few of his, the latest one that I’ve read is called “The Convenience Revolution” where he talks about reducing the friction in the sales process, it’s such a great thing. I’ve used that same kind of a phrase before and he articulates it so well. We cause friction from people like you’ll hear in another one of my episodes where I talk about people that tell you no, or take longer to tell you why they can’t do something they actually do it, that’s friction. But if you ask him what he does, he doesn’t say, “I’m one of the leading customer service experts in the world,” which he could, but that would be all about him. What he would say is, he would ask you, “Have you ever been to a restaurant, a hotel, or a business and just had a great, just amazing customer service experience?” And the person he’s asking would probably or hopefully say, “Well, yes” I help companies like yours do that. And now you want to know how, how do you do that? How you do that, in his case it’s speaking, training, books, et cetera.

So what is your elevator pitch? If you’re talking about what you do, there’s no benefit there. If you’re talking about yourself, well I do this, this and this, you’re not including them in the conversation. So can you do your elevator pitch? Can you give five seconds or seven seconds so that they’ll do, another speaker friend of mine, Brian Walter, he says he wanted to do the Scooby-Doo look, like huh, say something and have them go huh. They want to know more then. Then you’ll have your next, maybe 10 seconds, tell them a little bit about what you do and then if they want to find out more then you get to have a conversation. But you want to engage them in it. You want them to feel like, oh, this person can help me with what they do as opposed to this person talking all about themselves. I think we’ve all been there at networking events where we meet someone new and we ask them what they do. And they just start talking about what they do but they’re not engaging you in that. They’re just talking about what they do or talking about their experience. Okay, but how is that going to help me? How do I want to find out more? And that’s why it was in my book, “Shut Up and Sell More,” asking better questions is going to get people more interested.

It’s the same idea you go to a networking event, you meet someone, you ask them what they do, they tell you and then you say, “Oh, tell me more. Tell me more about that. How did you get into that? Or why do you do that?” Asking them questions. When you’re asking them questions, they like you better. When you’re asking them questions, you’re learning things you don’t know. When you’re talking, everything you say you already know, usually how I start my Shut Up and Sell More presentations with that very phrase, when you’re speaking everything you’re about to say, you already know. So the idea of the elevator pitch is to get someone to want to know more. And then you get to tell them more and now you get to engage them into how you could help them, with what you’re talking about. So it should be some structure or something to the effect of that, I help companies like yours.

So whatever that industry is, whatever they are I help couples like you if it’s a wedding have, fill in the blank, buy what. So we, I help couples like you have amazing culinary experiences at your wedding so that you and your guests will say, it’s the best food they’ve ever had at a wedding. That’s a version of that, whether you’re an officiant I help couples like you personalize your ceremonies so that your guests will think I’m a part of the family by the time they get done hearing so much that I know about you and that you’ve brought out together. These are just things I’m coming off the top of my head right now. I didn’t script that. It’s just the idea of knowing you and your businesses and being able to say, “How do you help other people?” That’s what your elevator pitch should be. Get them want to know more. And even if this is on your website you can have a variation of that where they can then click to find out more about that.

But when you get a phone call or when you meet someone at a networking event, or when you’re at a wedding show and somebody comes up, “What do you do?” “I’m a DJ,” that’s not good enough, there’s 12 other DJs here at the show. That’s not going to be good enough. I help couples like you and your guests have an amazing time at your wedding from the beginning of the ceremony, through the last dance the best time of your lives. How do you do that? Then we get to talk about those things there. And again, I’m just making stuff up on the fly here because I’m trying to think about you and your business. If you say, “Well, I’m a DJ and I have a photo booth and I have lighting.” Yeah, so do a lot of other people. As a matter of fact, I can take my credit card right now and go buy everything you have, that doesn’t make me you, it doesn’t make me have the experience. Not that they care about your experience, they care about the results of that experience.

So you want to get across in your elevator pitch that first few seconds you want them to want to know more. So think about the last time you did a wedding show. Do you stumble when people come up and say, “What do you do?” And you just talk about your services. We have a venue, we have a caterer, we do invitations, we do ceremonies, we do flowers. Not good enough, not good enough because everybody can say that. What are you going to say that they’re going to do their Scooby-Doo and go, “Huh, whoa, how do you do that?” Or “Tell me more about that” or “I want that.” And that’s what your elevator pitch is designed.

So practice it, write it down, test it with people. I was just doing this with a friend of mine. And he emailed me and I said, “You know what? That sounds like a tagline.” It didn’t sound like an elevator pitch, it sounded like something that would go under his company name on the website. That is a tagline, that is not an elevator pitch. An elevator pitch is that I help people like you, companies like you, couples like you, do what, get what result through what. That structure or some form of that structure is going to get them to then if they’re interested to go tell me more. Or how do you do that? So I hope that helps you. Write it down, figure it out, feel free to email it to me and say, “Alan, I got mine, here it is, what do you think?” Share it out there because that’s going to help all of us. I hope this has helped you.

I’m Alan Berg. Thanks for listening. If you have any questions about this or if you’d like to suggest other topics for “The Wedding Business Solutions Podcast” please let me know. My email is Alan@WeddingBusinessSolutions.com. Look forward to seeing you on the next episode. Thanks.

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©2021 Wedding Business Solutions LLC & AlanBerg.com

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